Research Paper Proofreading And Editing

A little more about us.

Proof-Reading-Service.com provides professional proofreading services exclusively for professors, lecturers, post-doctoral researchers, research students and business customers. Our aim is to meet the growing demand for English-language services from academics and business people around the world. We are a dedicated provider of scientific and academic proofreading and editing services for the authors of PhD theses, dissertations, research papers, journal articles, books, essays and other professional documents, such as research proposals, in the Sciences, the Social Sciences and the Humanities.

Our very competitive prices are set at a fixed rate per thousand words (see Prices), and the price remains the same irrespective of the complexity of the work or the amount of corrections required.

We have helped many senior academics including professors and researchers by proofreading their written work before it was accepted for publication. Without proofreading, the work would not have been accepted. In many cases, customers have contacted us to proofread their work because it was rejected on the first submission due to too many errors of English spelling and grammar. In most of these cases, the document was accepted for publication after proofreading.

Our dedicated team of journal editors and proofreaders will give you more confidence in the work that you submit with our journal editing and proofreading services. The author instructions provided by academic and scientific journals must be followed with precision when preparing a scholarly article for publication or the paper may be rejected without serious consideration of its content; the same problem can arise if an article written in the English language contains too many grammar, spelling and punctuation errors. Our academic and scientific journal editors and proofreaders can help you to ensure that this does not happen to your articles by resolving any problems with your language, adjusting your formatting and references to conform consistently to journal requirements and correcting simple typing errors.

Preparing an academic or scientific article or manuscript for publication in a scholarly journal is far from a simple process. Producing sound and engaging content is only the first of many concerns. The language in which a paper is written must be clear and correct to communicate complex information effectively. Tables and figures must be designed to present complicated data in visually effective forms. References must be accurate, thorough and in the correct style, and all other aspects of formatting specified in the journal’s guidelines must be adopted consistently. The publication support services available through Proof-Reading-Service.com can help you correct and polish these aspects of your article, significantly increasing your chances of successful publication.

Scientific manuscript editing and proofreading services for researchers and scientists across all scientific fields, including medical, biological and physical sciences, are also offered by Proof-Reading-Service.com. Scientific writing must be accurate and informative, reporting complex methods and data clearly and consistently, but in most cases it also needs to follow specific formatting and stylistic guidelines (such as the author instructions of scholarly journals) with precision, and the best scientific writing is also engaging and searching, which it can only be if it is very well written. The professional scientific editing services from Proof-Reading-Service.com can help you to meet the rigorous demands of scientific writing and reduce the risk of rejection or failure by checking and correcting your grammar, spelling, punctuation, formatting and many other aspects of your documents.

Our professional PhD thesis and dissertation proofreading and editing services can help you to eliminate this risk by carefully checking the accuracy and consistency of your writing and formatting, correcting errors where necessary and suggesting possible improvements. Years of planning, research, discussion, writing and editing (not to mention tuition) are invested in the PhD thesis or dissertation that is usually required to earn a doctoral degree at universities, yet a PhD student can risk failure after all that hard work if the university or department guidelines have not been followed or the thesis contains too many grammar, spelling and punctuation errors.

Your document is proofread using the ‘track changes’ function of Microsoft Word. This is a standard function installed in most versions of Microsoft Word. This function allows you to move easily between changes and accept any or all of the modifications proposed by the proofreader. Corrections, suggestions and comments are shown in the right-hand margin and are easy to accept into your document.

LaTeX documents can also be proofread. It would help if you include any unusual style files that you used (e.g. journal, style, sty, tex or ps files). We are able to show what alterations our editor has made to a PDF document. This will highlight any changes to the text.

We cover all academic areas with a bank of proofreaders who have expertise in a wide range of academic disciplines. Proof-Reading-Service.com is very selective when hiring proofreaders. We do not employ faceless contract proofreaders; at Proof-Reading-Service.com we personally select our proofreaders, and each is highly respected in the proofreading field. All of our proofreaders are native English speakers, educated at least to Masters level (some hold a PhD) with extensive university teaching and examining experience.

Apart from demonstrating their qualifications and experience, all of our proofreaders have to pass a tough entry assessment. We also monitor the work of our proofreaders on a regular basis. The advantage of our service over other proofreading services and individual proofreaders is that our proofreaders are fully approved and trusted. We guarantee an effective service and offer you 100% satisfaction. If you are unhappy with any aspect of our service we will refund your money or proofread your document again gratis.

The information provided to Proof-Reading-Service.com is held in absolute confidence and privacy. We guarantee never to give away your personal information, including your name, to any third party. Additionally, we go the extra mile to ensure that our IT equipment incorporates the latest security devices and software including encryption.

Before You Proofread

  • Be sure you've revised the larger aspects of the text. Don't make corrections at the sentence and word level [the act of editing] if you still need to work on the overall focus, development, and organization of the paper or you need to re-arrange or change specific sections [the act of revising].
  • Set your paper aside between writing and proofreading. Give yourself a day or so between the writing of your paper and proofreading it. This will help you identify mistakes more easily. This is also a reason why you shouldn't wait until the last minute to draft your paper because it won't provide the time needed between writing and proofreading.
  • Eliminate unnecessary words before looking for mistakes. Throughout your paper, you should try to avoid using inflated diction if a simpler phrase works equally well. Simple, precise language is easier to proofread than overly complex sentence constructions and vocabulary.
  • Know what to look for. Make a mental note of the mistakes you need to watch for based on comments from your professor on previous drafts of the paper or that you have received about papers written in other classes. This will help you to identify repeated patterns of mistakes more readily.
  • Review your list of references. Review the sources mentioned in your paper and make sure you have properly cited them in your bibliography. Also make sure that the titles cited in your bibliography are mentioned in the text. Any omissions should be resolved before you begin proofreading your paper.

NOTE:  Do not confuse the act of revising your paper with the act of editing it. Editing is intended to tighten up language so that your paper is easier to read and understand. This should be the focus when you proofread. If your professor asks you to revise your paper, the implication is that there is something within the text that needs to be changed, improved, or re-organized in some significant way. If the reason for a revision is not specified, always ask for clarification.


Strategies to Help Identify Errors

  1. Work from a printout, not a computer screen. Besides sparing your eyes the strain of glaring at the computer, proofreading from a printout allows you to easily skip around to where errors might have been repeated throughout the paper [e.g., misspelled name of a person].
  2. Read out loud. This is especially helpful for spotting run-on sentences, but you'll also hear other problems that you may not have identified while reading the text out loud. This will also helps you play the role of the reader, thereby, encouraging you to understand the paper as your audience might.
  3. Use a ruler or blank sheet of paper to cover up the lines below the one you're reading. This technique keeps you from skipping over possible mistakes. This also helps you deliberately pace yourself as you read through your paper.
  4. Circle or highlight every punctuation mark in your paper. This forces you to pay attention to each mark you used and to question its purpose in each sentence or paragraph. This is a particularly helpful strategy if you tend to misuse or overuse a punctuation mark, such as a comma or semi-colon.
  5. Use the search function of the computer to find mistakes. Using the search [find] feature of your word processor can help you identify common errors faster. For example, if you overuse a phrase or use the same qualifier over and over again, you can do a search for those words or phrases and in each instance make a decision about whether to remove it or use a synonym.
  6. If you tend to make many mistakes, check separately for each kind of error, moving from the most to the least important, and following whatever technique works best for you to identify that kind of mistake. For instance, read through once [backwards, sentence by sentence] to check for fragments; read through again [forward] to be sure subjects and verbs agree, and again [perhaps using a computer search for "this," "it," and "they"] to trace pronouns to antecedents.
  7. End with using a computer spell checker or reading backwards word by word. Remember that a spell checker won't catch mistakes with homonyms [e.g., "they're," "their," "there"] or certain typos [like "he" when you meant to write "the"]. The spell-checker function is not a substitute for carefully reviewing the text for spelling errors.
  8. Leave yourself enough time. Since many errors are made and overlooked by speeding through writing and proofreading, setting aside the time to carefully review your writing will help you catch errors you might otherwise miss. Always read through your writing slowly. If you read through the paper at a normal speed, you won't give your eyes sufficient time to spot errors.
  9. Ask a friend to read your paper. Offer to proofread a friend's paper if they will review yours. Having another set of eyes look over your writing will often spot errors that you would have otherwise missed.

Individualize the Act of Proofreading

In addition to following the suggestions above, individualizing your proofreading process to match weaknesses in your writing will help you proofread more efficiently and effectively. For example, I still tend to make subject-verb agreement errors. Accept the fact that you likely won't be able to check for everything, so be introspective about what your typical problem areas are and look for each type of error individually. Here's how:

  • Think about what errors you typically make. Review instructors' comments about your writing and/or set up an appointment review your paper with a staff member in the Writing Center.
  • Learn how to fix those errors. Talk with your professor about helping you understand why you make the errors you do make so that you can learn how to avoid them.
  • Use specific strategies. Develop strategies you are most comfortable with to find and correct your particular errors in usage, sentence structure, spelling, and punctuation.
  • Where you proofread is important! Effective and efficient proofreading requires extended focus and concentration. If you are easily distracted by external activity or noise, proofread in a quiet corner of the library rather than at a table in Starbucks.
  • Proofread in several short blocks of time. Avoid trying to proofread you entire paper all at once, otherwise, it will be difficult to maintain your concentration. A good strategy is to start your proofreading each time at the beginning of your paper. It will take longer to make corrections, but you'll be amazed at how many mistakes you find in text that you have already reviewed.

In general, verb tense should be in the following format, although variations can occur within the text depending on the narrative style of your paper. Note that references to prior research mentioned anywhere in your paper should always be stated in the past tense.

  1. Abstract--past tense [a summary description of what I did]
  2. Introduction--present tense [I am describing the study to you now]
  3. Literature Review--past tense [the studies you are reviewing have already been written]
  4. Methodology--past tense [the way that you gathered and synthesized data has already happened, otherwise, how could you write your paper?]
  5. Results--past tense [the findings have already been discovered]
  6. Discussion--present tense [I am talking to you now about how I interpreted the findings]
  7. Conclusion--present tense [I am summarizing the study for you now]

Cogie, Jane, Kim Strain, and Sharon Lorinskas. "Avoiding the Proofreading Trap: The Value of the Error Correction Process." The Writing Center Journal 19 (Spring/Summer 1999): 7-32; Editing and Proofreading. The Writing Center. University of North Carolina; Editing and Proofreading Strategies. Writing@CSU. Colorado State University; Harris, Jeanette. "Proofreading: A Reading/Writing Skill." College Composition and Communication 38 (December 1987): 464-466; Lunsford, Andrea A. and Robert Connors. The St. Martin's Handbook. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1989; Madraso, Jan. "Proofreading: The Skill We've Neglected to Teach." The English Journal 82 (February 1993): 32-41; Proofreading. The Writer’s Handbook. Writing Center. University of Wisconsin, Madison; Proofreading. Department of English Writing Guide. George Mason University; Proofreading and Revising. Online Writing Center, Walden University; Proofreading a College Paper: Guidelines and Checklist. Troy University Library Tutorial; Revision: Cultivating a Critical Eye. Institute for Writing Rhetoric. Dartmouth College; Revision Guidelines. The Reading/Writing Center. Hunter College; Where Do I Begin? The Writing Lab and The OWL. Purdue University; Williams, Joseph M. and Lawrence McEnerney. Writing in College 3:A Strategy for Analyzing and Revising a First Draft. Writing Program, The University of Chicago.

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