Emily Dickinson Obsession With Death Essay

Two Viewpoints Of Death In Emily Dickinson's Poetry

Two of Emily Dickinson’s poems, “I heard a Fly buzz-when I died” and “Because I could not stop for Death” are both written about life’s stopping point, death. Although the poems are written by the same poet, both poems view death in a different manner. Between the two poems, one views death as having an everlasting life while the other anticipates everlasting life, only to realize it does not exist. While both poems are about death, both poems also illustrate that the outcome of death is a mysterious experience that can only be speculated upon with the anticipation of everlasting life.
In “I heard a Fly buzz-when I died” the woman seems to anticipate everlasting life, but does not find it. When the woman in the poem dies and her eyes or “…Windows…” (15) as the poem calls them, fail it represents that she sees nothing after she is dead. The last line of the poem, “I could not see to see” (16) further supports that when she was dead there was nothing further to explore. The poem, “I heard a Fly buzz-when I died” does not support that the woman has found everlasting life. Although everlasting life is not found in “I heard a Fly buzz-when I died” it can be found in another poem of Emily Dickinson’s.
In “Because I could not stop for Death” the woman seems to anticipate everlasting life, and has found it. The woman in the poem has been taken away by death. It almost seems as if the lady is reminiscing through her life as a child, an adult, and then she finds death. The death portion of her life is represented by “We passed the setting sun” (12). Reading through the poems leads one to believe the woman was very comfortable with death and all it had to offer. The woman in the poem is so comfortable in her new state that time trickles by, feeling “…shorter than the Day” (22). The...

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Emily Dickinson's Feelings About Death Revealed in Her Poem, Because I could not stop for Death

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1314 words - 5 pages Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was a very talented poet. Her poems contained deep emotions and continue to amaze her readers. She was born in Amherst Massachusetts on December 10, 1830 to Attorney Edward Dickinson and Emily Norcross Dickinson. Her mother was very emotionally accessible. Dickinson was an energetic and outgoing child. She attended Amherst Academy and Mount Holyoke Female Seminary. Her father took her out of school after a year at Mount...

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Emily Dickinson's Living Death Essay

Emily Dickinson was born December 10, 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts to a governing father and an almost non-existent mother. Her father was a lawyer, a legislator and a rigorous Calvinist. Although her father had strong faith in God, Dickinson declined to pronounce herself as a believing Christian in her late teens. In her younger years Dickinson considered herself different because she was shy and sensitive (Emily Dickinson’s Life and Work). Dickinson and her younger sister Lavinia started their education at Amherst Academy. Dickinson spent seven years at the academy. After finishing her final term at the Academy in the August 1847, Dickinson began attending South Hadley Seminary for Women, now know as Mount Holyoke College, about ten miles from Amherst. She stayed at the seminary for only ten months. According to The Academy of American Poets article, the explanation for her short duration at the seminary was severe homesickness. Regardless of the specific reason for leaving South Hadley, she was brought back home to Amherst (Poets.org).
Dickinson was troubled from a young age by death, especially the deaths of those who were close to her. When her second cousin and close friend, Sophia Holland, grew ill from typhus and died in 1844, Dickinson was distressed. She became so unhappy that her parents sent her to stay with family in Boston to recover. After recovering, she came back to Amherst to finish her time at the academy (Poets.org). In “I Felt a Funeral in My Brain,” the speaker shows that death is a numbing experience. Death is reflected everywhere in Emily Dickinson’s poetry; she lived shadowed by death; she was a hermit; her home was a casket from which she rarely left; she, as a living death, wrote about her life, a death.
Emily Dickinson withdrew from society around 1860. Dickinson lived in almost total physical isolation from the outside world. According to Masako Takeda, The cause for Dickinson’s seclusion was that she suffered a broken heart by Reverend Charles Wadsworth. Dickinson spent the majority of her days alone in her house until the year 1861 when she completely secluded herself and her poetry from the rest of the world. Dickinson’s seclusion from society was the time when she really picked up her writing. June 16, 1874, her father Edward Dickinson died after a stroke. She didn’t attend the funeral; instead she stayed in her room only. This loss pushed her further into seclusion (Takeda).
Known for her seclusion from the outer world and introvert nature, Dickinson gave her poetry a unique touch. Dickinson is a major figure in American literature; in her review of the Dickinson Electronic Archives, Martha Smith says, “She is widely regarded as the quintessential American poet, and her work a foundation upon which twentieth-century American poetry is built” (Smith). This is because of Dickinson’s unique style of writing for her era. Her poems were generally written in short lines and lacked titles. It was uncommon in...

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Emily Dickinson's Feelings About Death Revealed in Her Poem, Because I could not stop for Death

2713 words - 11 pages Emily Dickinson's Feelings About Death Revealed in Her Poem, Because I could not stop for Death Emily Dickinson grew up in New England in the late 1800s. The nineteenth century was a difficult time period for the people of America. There was an abundance of war, epidemic, and death. Because her house was located beside a graveyard, Dickinson saw many of the elaborate funeral processions as they passed (Murray). Because of these experiences,...

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An anylytical commenting on Emily Dickinson's "Because I did not stop for death."

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